Fresh Air from WHYY, the Peabody Award-winning weekday magazine of contemporary arts and issues, is one of public radio's most popular programs. Hosted by Terry Gross, the show features intimate conversations with today's biggest luminaries.

LATEST EPISODE

Fresh Air

Free Climbing Yosemite's 'Dawn Wall'

Rock climbers Tommy Caldwell and Kevin Jorgeson talk about scaling the 3,000 foot sheer vertical face of Yosemite's El Capitan that was long thought impossible to ascend. The duo discuss sleeping in portaledges ? tents suspended more than a thousand feet in the air ? and the personal risks and rewards of rock climbing. The new documentary about their historic climb is 'The Dawn Wall.' John Powers reviews two new crime dramas based on true stories ? the Showtime series 'Escape at Dannemora,' starring Patricia Arquette and Benicio del Toro, and the Bravo series 'Dirty John,' starring Connie Britton and Eric Bana. Film critic Justin Chang reviews the costume drama, 'The Favourite,' starring Emma Stone and Rachel Weisz.
00:48:56 11/20/2018

Past Episodes

The Coen brothers ('Oh Brother, Where Art Thou?,' 'No Country for Old Men') pay homage to old Westerns with their new film, 'The Ballad of Buster Scruggs.' The movie is a collection of six stories that often subvert the expectations of the genre.
00:48:29 11/19/2018
"Every surface, every bit of air, every bit of water in your home is alive," says scientist Rob Dunn. His new book, 'Never Home Alone,' examines the bacteria, fungi, viruses, parasites and insects we live with ? from armpit bacteria to black mold in our walls. Also, linguist Geoff Nunberg chooses 'nationalist' as his word of 2018.In 'Burning,' Steven Yeun plays a mysterious South Korean playboy who may or may not be murdering his girlfriends. "To this day, I'm the only one who knows who Ben really is," he says of the character. He spoke with 'Fresh Air' producer Sam Briger.
00:50:27 11/16/2018
On Nov. 18, 1978, an itinerant preacher, faith healer and civil rights activist named the Rev. Jim Jones led more than 900 of his followers to kill themselves by drinking cyanide-laced Flavor Aid at their Jonestown settlement in the jungle of Guyana. 40 years later, questions still linger regarding the Jonestown massacre and the man who inspired it. Journalist Jeff Guinn details how Jones captivated his followers in the book 'The Road to Jonestown.' Also, TV critic David Bianculli reviews the AMC spy thriller series 'Little Drummer Girl.'
00:48:00 11/16/2018
A new video series by 'New York Times' reporter Adam Ellick explores Russia's role in spreading fake news, dating back to the '80s conspiracy theory that the AIDS virus was created by the U.S. military. Ellick also talks about the impact of Russian disinformation in the U.S. "This country is so split and divided that we're not using this Soviet disinformation playbook on ourselves."Also, film critic Justin Chang reviews the heist thriller 'Widows,' starring Viola Davis and directed by Steve McQueen.
00:48:16 11/15/2018
Sandi Tan was 19 when she wrote and starred in a film directed by her 40-year old mentor. But then her mentor disappeared and took the film's footage with him. 20 years later, Tan got the footage back. She revisits the mystery of her mentor's disappearance and the film that was never made in a new Netflix documentary 'Shirkers.' In 'Burning,' Steven Yeun plays a mysterious South Korean playboy who may or may not be murdering his girlfriends. "To this day, I'm the only one who knows who Ben really is," he says of the character. He spoke with 'Fresh Air' producer Sam Briger. Also, linguist Geoff Nunberg chooses 'nationalist' as his word of 2018.
00:49:10 11/14/2018
Karina Longworth's new book, 'Seduction,' focuses on 10 women that had relationships with Howard Hughes and the exploitation of actresses in Old Hollywood. She also reflects on the #MeToo movement and women coming forward against Harvey Weinstein: "The thing that I've come to understand from studying the 20th century of Hollywood is that these things have always happened, and they were never talked about publicly," she says. "So just the fact that we're having a conversation is completely revolutionary." Longworth's podcast, 'You Must Remember This,' is about the forgotten stories of Hollywood's first century.Also we remember Marvel Comics writer, editor, publisher Stan Lee. He died yesterday at 95. Lee spoke with Terry Gross in 1991 about coming up with Spider-Man, inventing new sound effects for his comics, and why superheroes have colorful costumes.
00:49:05 11/13/2018
"Every surface, every bit of air, every bit of water in your home is alive," says scientist Rob Dunn. His new book, 'Never Home Alone,' examines the bacteria, fungi, viruses, parasites and insects we live with ? from armpit bacteria to black mold in our walls. Book critic Maureen Corrigan reviews 'A Ladder to the Sky' by John Boyne. She calls it "maliciously witty, erudite and ingeniously constructed."
00:48:14 11/12/2018
Religion scholar Elaine Pagels lost her young son to terminal illness and her husband a year later in an accident. Her new book, 'Why Religion?' combines memoir and biblical scholarship and reflects on loss and faith. Rock critic Ken Tucker reviews the album 'Interstate Gospel' from the country trio Pistol Annies, comprised of Ashley Monroe, Miranda Lambert and Angaleena Presley.Chef José Andrés talks about why "vegetables are sexy," reinventing the Philly Cheesesteak and growing up in Spain. His memoir is 'We Fed an Island.'
00:49:18 11/9/2018
Terry Gross spoke with Queen lead guitarist Brian May in 2010 about recording the many vocals in 'Bohemian Rhapsody,' writing the anthem 'We Will Rock You' and getting a PhD in astrophysics. The new biopic 'Bohemian Rhapsody,' about Freddie Mercury and the meteoric rise of Queen, is now in theaters. Also, film critic Justin Chang reviews the Coen Brothers' new film, 'The Ballad of Buster Scruggs,' coming to Netflix Nov. 16.
00:47:33 11/9/2018
In 2015, Saudi Arabia initiated a bombing campaign against Yemen that contributed to what is now the world's largest humanitarian crisis. Today, 14 million people in Yemen face starvation. Journalist Robert Worth says the country is "no longer a functioning state" ? and that Americans share some of the blame, since the Obama administration backed the Saudis. "We gave a green light for it in 2015, and then we stood by and let it continue as it got worse and worse," he says.
00:48:53 11/8/2018

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