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The Daily

A Guide to the Democratic Debates

Over the next two days, 20 Democrats will take the stage for the first debates of the 2020 presidential race. We look at the competing visions for America they'll be fighting over this week, and throughout the campaign. Guest: Alexander Burns, who covers national politics for The New York Times. For more information on today's episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Background reading: Does anyone deserve to have a billion dollars? How many hours of sleep do you get? The Times asked 21 Democratic presidential candidates the same set of questions. Here's what they said, and here are some takeaways.For the candidates, these early debates may represent the first, best ? and, in some cases, only ? opportunity to stand out from competitors and build national momentum in the primary. Here's how they're preparing.Senator Elizabeth Warren is the only candidate on the first night who is polling in double digits, but there are plenty of story lines and political dynamics to watch for.
00:21:20 6/25/2019

Past Episodes

In the weeks since the Mueller report, nearly 80 House Democrats have called for impeaching the president. But with the 2020 campaign underway, the likelihood of such action appears to be fading. That may be exactly what some Democratic leaders want. Guests: Peter Baker, who covers the White House for The New York Times, spoke with Representative Zoe Lofgren, a California Democrat and a member of the House Judiciary Committee. For more information on today's episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Background reading: In a House that can be dominated by voices on the left, centrist freshman Democrats who flipped seats in 2018 may have the final say on impeachment.Here's a refresher on how impeachment works.
00:25:24 6/24/2019
A military crackdown in Sudan has left more than 100 pro-democracy protesters dead, just weeks after the military offered support in overthrowing the country's dictator. Our colleague spoke with us from Sudan's capital, Khartoum. Guest: Declan Walsh, the Cairo bureau chief for The New York Times. For more information on today's episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Background reading:Lt. Gen. Mohamed Hamdan, the leader of the paramilitary forces that carried out the killings, is now considered by many to be the de facto ruler of Sudan.Listen to an episode of "The Daily" about the fall of Sudan's longtime dictator, President Omar Hassan al-Bashir, who was deposed by his own generals in May.
00:24:09 6/23/2019
The Trump administration has been debating a military strike against Iran as tensions with the country escalate. Here's how we got to this point. Guest: Mark Landler, who covers the White House for The New York Times. For more information on today's episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Background reading: President Trump approved military strikes against Iran in retaliation for downing an American drone, but abruptly called them off on Thursday night.Mr. Trump has veered between bellicose threats against America's enemies and promises to get the United States out of foreign wars. He may soon have to choose. The United States and Iran, two longtime adversaries, are once again hurtling toward potential crisis. That course was set a year ago.
00:24:10 6/20/2019
With asylum requests at a record high, the Trump administration is telling migrants to wait in Mexico. We look at how that policy could fundamentally change immigration in the United States. Guests: Natalie Kitroeff, a business reporter for The New York Times, spoke with Zolan Kanno-Youngs, who covers homeland security. For more information on today's episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Background reading: A recent State Department report acknowledged the possibility that migrants from Central America were no safer in Mexico than at home from the gangs that had threatened them.The cornerstone of President Trump's deal to avert tariffs with Mexico ? the terms of which were largely already agreed-upon in December ? was an expansion of the "Remain in Mexico" program.
00:29:33 6/19/2019
The president kicked off his re-election campaign on Tuesday with a rally in Orlando, Fla. We spoke with a colleague who was there. Guest: Maggie Haberman, who covers the White House for The New York Times. For more information on today's episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Background reading: President Trump's messaging at the rally signals a bet that his 2020 campaign will be a replay of 2016 ? but this time, with the full support of the Republican Party.Here are eight things our reporters learned from attending the rally.The 2020 election is shaping up as a test: Was Mr. Trump's victory a historical fluke, or a genuine reflection of America today?
00:23:15 6/18/2019
A New York Times investigation found that the United States is actively infiltrating Russia's electric power grid. We look at what that means for the future of cyberwarfare. Guest: David E. Sanger, a national security correspondent for The New York Times and the author of "The Perfect Weapon: War, Sabotage, and Fear in the Cyber Age." For more information on today's episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Background reading: The cyberattacks on Russia's power grid are intended partly as a warning, and partly to be poised to act if a major conflict broke out between Washington and Moscow.In response to The Times's report, the Kremlin warned that American attacks could escalate into cyberwar.
00:26:05 6/17/2019
In Hong Kong, hundreds of thousands remain in the streets, even after city officials said they would suspend the contentious extradition bill that prompted the demonstrations in the first place. We look at why the protesters still don't trust their government. Guest: Austin Ramzy, who covers Hong Kong for The New York Times. For more information on today's episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Background reading: If the shelving of the extradition bill and an apology from Hong Kong's leader were aimed at mollifying the protesters, the measures seem to have had the opposite effect.The bill's suspension is China's biggest concession to public pressure in President Xi Jinping's nearly seven years as leader of the country.Here are photographs of the protests, which are some of the largest in the history of Hong Kong.
00:23:17 6/16/2019
Across Europe, populists are saying that it's not democracy they aim to discard, but liberalism. To end our series, we returned to Germany, the country at the heart of a liberal Europe, to see if the rejection of liberalism had also taken hold there.Guests: Katrin Bennhold, the Berlin bureau chief for The New York Times, and Clare Toeniskoetter and Lynsea Garrison, producers for "The Daily," went to an election party in Berlin for the far-right party Alternative for Germany. For more information on today's episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Background reading: Germany's political establishment looks increasingly fragile after the European Parliament elections.As anti-Semitic crime rises in Germany, new forms of old hatreds are stoking fear for the nation's estimated 200,000 Jews.Katrin Bennhold offers her main takeaway after 10 days on the road: "Europe cannot be taken for granted. But neither can its demise."
00:29:32 6/13/2019
In Poland, a nationalist party has been in power for four years. We went to Warsaw, the capital, and Gdansk, the birthplace of a movement that brought down Communism, to see how this government has changed democratic institutions. Guests: Katrin Bennhold, the Berlin bureau chief for The New York Times, and Clare Toeniskoetter and Lynsea Garrison, producers for "The Daily," spoke with Jaroslaw Kurski, a newspaper editor; Magdalena Adamowicz, a politician and the widow of a liberal mayor who was murdered; and Danuta Bialooka-Kostenecka, an official with the governing Law and Justice party. For more information on today's episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Background reading: Poland's nationalists aren't seeking to take the country out of the European Union, but to take the European Union out of Poland.With national elections approaching, both the government and its opponents have sought to shape the country's historical memory.Poland's governing party has made opposition to gay rights a cornerstone of its campaigning, escalating fears that the divisive rhetoric could translate to violence.
00:33:02 6/12/2019
In Italy, hard-right populists have moved from the fringes to run the national government. Now, the country is on the front lines of a nationalist resurgence in Europe. To understand why, we spent a day with Susanna Ceccardi, a rising star of the far-right League party. Guest Host: Katrin Bennhold, the Berlin bureau chief for The New York Times, and Clare Toeniskoetter and Lynsea Garrison, producers for "The Daily," hit the campaign trail with Ms. Ceccardi in Tuscany. For more information on today's episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Background reading: Ms. Ceccardi is among a group of nationalist politicians seeking to break the European Union from the inside.A victory for the anti-immigrant League party in the European Parliament elections gave Matteo Salvini, the party's leader and Italy's interior minister, the strongest claim to the leadership of Europe's populists.
00:31:08 6/11/2019

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